Comments on: pueraria lobata http://m.ammoth.us/blog/2009/11/pueraria-lobata/ the herculez gomez of architecture blogs Fri, 14 Nov 2014 16:37:48 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.4.10 By: Performative Organic Machines | Landscaping L.A. « dpr-barcelona http://m.ammoth.us/blog/2009/11/pueraria-lobata/comment-page-1/#comment-15483 Sun, 27 Jun 2010 19:38:54 +0000 http://m.ammoth.us/blog/?p=1084#comment-15483 […] of trees as performative machines, subject developed later by mammoth. As refered by Holmes in a previous post, he catched up our attention on some kind of vegetal infrastructure which appears in all cities: […]

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By: future forests of the infrastructural city – mammoth // building nothing out of something http://m.ammoth.us/blog/2009/11/pueraria-lobata/comment-page-1/#comment-15064 Tue, 22 Jun 2010 19:30:44 +0000 http://m.ammoth.us/blog/?p=1084#comment-15064 […] that we ought to begin to value these plants (many of whom are often lumped together under the derogatory rubric of “invasives”) and the communities that they form, because they provide ecological services at a uniquely low […]

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By: faslanyc http://m.ammoth.us/blog/2009/11/pueraria-lobata/comment-page-1/#comment-4681 Fri, 20 Nov 2009 00:18:26 +0000 http://m.ammoth.us/blog/?p=1084#comment-4681 Agreed. at the very least, it’s another variable la’s should be cognizant of when designing the landscape and its systems, etc.

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By: rholmes http://m.ammoth.us/blog/2009/11/pueraria-lobata/comment-page-1/#comment-4661 Thu, 19 Nov 2009 18:15:12 +0000 http://m.ammoth.us/blog/?p=1084#comment-4661 faslanyc:

not sure that la’s work is here, but maybe

Certainly hacking species range is not going to become the new arrangement of subdivision plots or anything, and the migration of tree species is probably a bigger concern for other sets of land-related professions (foresters, for instance), but it seems to me like a valid concern for some landscape architects in at least some cases: the landscape architect from the Park Service who we worked with in the studio I mentioned, or one dealing with the question of what kind of forest might be appropriate to establish on a heavily disturbed urban site, for instance.

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By: namhenderson http://m.ammoth.us/blog/2009/11/pueraria-lobata/comment-page-1/#comment-4638 Thu, 19 Nov 2009 03:16:35 +0000 http://m.ammoth.us/blog/?p=1084#comment-4638 Also could LAs perhaps created the geography of natural selection to direct speciation?

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By: namhenderson http://m.ammoth.us/blog/2009/11/pueraria-lobata/comment-page-1/#comment-4637 Thu, 19 Nov 2009 03:14:49 +0000 http://m.ammoth.us/blog/?p=1084#comment-4637 A friend of mine graduated with a Phd in Religion and Nature. He always used the term, non-human nature.

Additionally, many non-Western cultures make the clear point that humans are nature.

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By: faslanyc http://m.ammoth.us/blog/2009/11/pueraria-lobata/comment-page-1/#comment-4631 Wed, 18 Nov 2009 22:38:08 +0000 http://m.ammoth.us/blog/?p=1084#comment-4631 not sure that la’s work is here, but maybe, especially in the zones where species migration crosses through heavily human environments. E.O Wilson has a lot to say about the subject in “the diversity of life” which i’ve been plowing through recently. He notes that most species don’t migrate fast enough to keep up with the pace of change we’re seeing (and this was back in 1992) but that initial attempts to transplant certain species (he was working with butterflies) were effective, suggesting that human intervention can be effective. Of course, then you’d have to deal with NON-NATIVE BUTTERFLIES!

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