army-corps-of-engineers – mammoth // building nothing out of something

Tag Archives: army-corps-of-engineers

IHNC Lake Borgne Surge Barrier

[The site of the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal (IHNC) Lake Borgne Surge Barrier, at the intersection of the Gulf Intercoastal Waterway and the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet; more detail on this Army Corps of Engineers project map.] [Building a bigger wall: the Surge Barrier was the largest design-build project in the history of the Army […]

pump test

["On Tuesday, May 24, pump number eight at the West Closure Complex was successfully tested. There are a total of 11 pumps at the [Complex], and each can individually fill an olympic-sized swimming pool in less than a minute.” (Source.)] [While most of the Mississippi River flood control infrastructures that we have looked at have […]

bayou chene closure project

[During the May 2011 operation of the Morganza Spillway, the Army Corps of Engineers closed one channel within the southern Atchafalaya Basin, Bayou Chene, by dredging the edges of a narrow strait in the Bayou, lining it with rip-rap and sinking a 20,000-ton, 500-foot long barge in the resulting chokepoint.  By stemming the flow down […]

atchafalaya iii: the morgan city floodwall

[The twin Atchafalaya river ports of Morgan City (on the east bank) and Berwick (on the west bank), captured in false-color by the "Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer" on NASA's Terra earth-imaging satellite, May 27, 2011 -- after the second opening of the Morganza Spillway.] Old River Control sits at the northern end […]

atchafalaya ii: old river control

[The Auxiliary Structure at Old River Control; photographed by the Army Corps of Engineers, Team New Orleans. Various circumstances have conspired to keep me from finishing the Floods series last week like I had hoped; there are still a few posts yet to come, and several of them will be part of this mini-series within […]

casting fields

[Map of revetments under the purview of the Army Corps of Engineers' Team New Orleans, on the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers; image produced by mammoth using data from the Army Corps.] I’ve already talked a fair about the idea that the Mississippi River is, at this point in its history, an artificially-constructed system that should […]

dike field

[A dike field in the Mississippi River near Greenfield, Mississippi; via bing maps.] In the Mississippi River, dike fields are constructed in order to direct the river’s flow to a central channel, scouring it and reducing the need for dredging.  Though their primary purpose is to thus maintain navigability for shipping, dike fields tend, as […]

the waterways experiment station

[The Waterways Experiment Station, in Vicksburg, Mississippi, is currently the home of the Army Corp's Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory.  (It also is the entity which operated the Mississippi Basin Model, and the research into flood control and river hydrology which was once conducted physically on that model and its sister models is now conducted, primarily […]

san francisco bay model

The San Francisco Bay Model was, like the Mississippi Basin Model, built by the Army Corps of Engineers to study the flow of water — in this case, simulating “the rise and fall of tide, flow, and currents of water, mixing of salt and fresh water, and… trends in sediment movement”, permitting the study of […]

ditch 6

[The "Ditch 6" levee at Hamburg, Iowa; photographed by the Army Corps of Engineers on June 16.  Following the breach of levee 575 which prompted the evacuation orders for southern Hamburg, the Army Corps "immediately underwent further construction to raise the elevation of Ditch 6 levee"; the plastic sheeting protects the soft earth of the […]

six dams and six reservoirs

[Fort Peck Lake (top), Spillway (middle) and Dam (above), in northeast Montana; built between 1933 and 1940, Fort Peck is the world's largest "hydraulically-filled" dam, which means that it was constructed by dredging suspended sediment from borrow pits and pumping it to discharge pipes at the dam site, where it settles onto the embankment.  (This […]

the mississippi river flood of 1927

[Map prepared by the US Coast and Geodetic Survey (the fore-runner of today's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) in 1927, after the Great Mississippi Flood of that year.  The map shows "flooded areas and the field of operations".  The great devastation produced by the 1927 flood -- it flooded an area approximately equal to the […]